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Pansy and marigold flowers, basil, chicory, red ruffles and flashy butter gem lettuces, mizuna, garlic chives, popcorn shoots and purple salvia become salad art at the Getty.

Pansy and marigold flowers, basil, chicory, red ruffles and flashy butter gem lettuces, mizuna, garlic chives, popcorn shoots and purple salvia as salad garden art.

For Julia Sherman’s salad garden project installed now at the Getty, thousands of heirloom plants were planted in nine raised beds in the museum’s sculpture garden.

Angeleno artist Michael Parker joined Sherman to taste each leaf in the garden to decide which plants would work their way into a single salad.

Parker and Sherman taste each leaf in the garden to decide what they want in their salad.

Parker and Sherman methodically taste each leaf in the garden.

Parker used pretty juicers he made of porcelain to whisk together a dressing of Meyer lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.

Los Angeles-based artist Michael Parker uses a porcelain juicer he made to whisk his salad dressing of Meyer lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

Parker’s salad dressing in situ.

Tender microgreen popcorn shoots were one of 50 heirloom varieties in the garden that made the cut for the final Parker-Sherman salad.

Tender microgreen popcorn shoots were harvested for the salad. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

Microgreen popcorn shoots

So did pansy blossoms.

Anything in the garden can be harvested, including these pansies, the rosemary and the merlot lettuce. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

One of nine raised beds in the Getty salad garden.

After everything was tasted, the salad included mizuna and flashy butter gem and red ruffles lettuces, chicory, basil and garlic chives, pansy and marigold blossoms along with purple salvia to give the salad more color. An errant ladybug was plucked out before the salad was dressed and tossed in a giant purple iridescent porcelain bowl made by Parker.

The Parker-Sherman salad.

After sampling every plant and tossing it with dressing, Michael Parker and Julia Sherman dig in.

Michael Parker and Julia Sherman dig into the salad, al fresco.

For more on Sherman’s salad garden project, check out my post for NPR’s The Salt blog.

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